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June 16, 2023

High School students help a man in a wheelchair mow his lawn, Alberta-made tech screens for early signs of Alzheimer’s and More

This Week In Tech, we talk about High School students help a man in a wheelchair mow his lawn again, technology made in Alberta will screen patients for early signs of Alzheimer's and new smart technology will help with traffic flow in Brant County.
Written By: AlphaKOR


Green Traffic Light

Photo Credit: grendelkhan on Pixabay

NEW SMART TECH TO HELP WITH TRAFFIC FLOW

Brent County to use new technology at three intersections

Brant County will introduce a new system that uses advanced sensors, cameras, and data analytics to monitor and regulate traffic flow efficiently. The technology will analyze real-time traffic patterns, detect congestion, and adapt the signal control, allowing authorities to optimize traffic signal timings and minimize congestion on roadways. The system will also provide valuable data for future transportation planning and infrastructure development.



Photo Credit: Daryll on Pixabay

STUDENTS HELP MAN IN A WHEELCHAIR CUT LAWN

Students at St. Anne High School engineer a way to cut grass

The technology students at St. Anne Catholic High School created prototypes and tested several ways to connect a lawn mower to a wheelchair. All in order to help ROb Piper cut his lawn again after 5 years. Piper said he loved cutting his lawn so much that he was thinking of starting his own business. But an accident left him injured and needing a wheelchair. After posting on Facebook how much he missed cutting his lawn, he connected with students in the technology program at St. Anne. The students created and tested prototypes to connect a lawnmower to a wheelchair. After many tests, they had a connecter that worked.


Read More: CBC



Photo Credit: Kiattisak Lamchan on Canva

NEW TECHNOLOGY TO HELP SCREEN FOR ALZHEIMER’S

Alberta-made tech screens speech patterns for early signs

A groundbreaking technological innovation in Alberta, aims to help individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s and Dementia regain their ability to communicate. Researchers at the University of Alberta developed a speech technology system that uses artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to analyze and interpret vocal patterns and fluctuations in speech, providing valuable insights into a person’s cognitive health. By analyzing the speech patterns, the technology can identify early signs of Alzheimer’s and Dementia, allowing for early intervention and treatment. This groundbreaking development in technology has the potential to greatly improve the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer’s and Dementia, enabling healthcare professionals to provide more effective care to those affected by these conditions.


Read More: Global News